The Degree of Campus Love – BY MBUGUA DANIEL

There exists a thin difference between love and friendship. It is evident that most of us including myself are caught in between unawares. In a situation that tires your brain, body and heart; leaves one unfeeling. It feels so good to have someone you call ‘my love’. Does true love really exist in campus relationships?

True love in this context demands a lot and it is true that most of us do not deliver as expected. It is hard to avoid it, some comrades will say that. We are social beings and in a way I support that claim. But lets us look it in a more specific way. How did it start? How is the going? Are you comfortable in that relationship? What makes you feel you want to stay or break? If every comrade was to answer that question, we would produce large volumes of documents enough to fill 2nd floor shelves in MTL library!

Must you be in a relationship? Being in a relationship is a choice that means we are not forced to be. In other words, it is an open aspect and depending on what you want and how you want to live your life in campus can motivate you to be or remain single. Certainly, we have our reasons to be in a ‘love’ life or not. And what is this love in our context? We can explain that with what it is not: you love to get that prestigious life (he pay for drinks, bus fare and take you out on weekends and or social supremacy), you love to satisfy your ‘craving’ (mostly dudes), you love because you had a crash with someone, you love because he is handsome or she is so beautiful to let go!

A higher mind in this campus has said that relationship-gone-sour cases have increased as from last academic year and it is disturbing. Ladies are impregnated and the men, who are responsible for that, are having fun with other ladies who are not pregnant disowning the expectant ones. This is very distressing in that as a lady you cannot just watch him walk around campus having fun and to make matters worse, he denies you in broad day light. The same case to men, they are left empty, hopeless and feel used.

We cannot wholly conclude that love and relationships have a bitter ending. We can sight example of few couples who have made it and are living happily-there-after. It must also come to our notice that to maintain a relationship is quite a task. When little problems arise between you, it is wise to solve them immediately and evade from reaching the administrators because that is unnecessary. But if it has a life-size magnitude, well, you must let them know your case and help you out.

In all circumstances, avoid unprotected sex. Always use a condom. If it is a must you do it, ladies, confirm that he has a condom. Gentlemen, do not be persuaded to have it unprotected. It does not matter whether it is her birthday, your anniversary or she just got 29 out of 30 in a CAT! Three things remain constant: pregnancy, STI and AIDS.

Take charge of your life. And be warned, relationship-gone-sour cases are treated with at most seriousness! The constitution is in actual fact very tough on us: men. If possible, avoid awakening unripe love until it ripens and what is more, you are ready for it.

The writer is a 2nd year, LMC Student School of Arts & Social Sciences

Five Categories of Campus Life – BY OYONGE OYONGE

You’ll understand that we are actually one people only that we have different ways of expressing ourselves. These phenomena led to my discovery that campus students are of five different categories. We as the media people, our work are to dig deep into social parameters, uproot and bring to limelight the hidden aspects. Here are the five categories of comrades.

The Okoa Jahazi/ Uwezo Tariff Students

As the name Okoa Jahazi suggests, these are students who out of their ‘Uwezo’ will always be willing to lend helping hand to their fellows. However, in their mind, lies a long list of benefits. The intended benefits can either be material or sexual. They are fast to invite their first-time friends for meals, ready to assist the lazy flocks with class work, they seem to know it all and are usually good in perfecting the act of good character. They however, play an important role in assisting they who haven’t adjusted to campus life. They always occupy about ¾ of your call logs (Missed & Received calls.)

Ongea Tariff/Free call Students

‘Ongea’, they speak of anything, anywhere, anyhow and to anybody. Remember the free calls? People speak of anything that comes to their mind. They are always the loudest debes who shout as though addressing a public rally of ‘common wananchi’. The words they speak are seldom important, as they usually target amusements and have no principle s and sense to direction to govern their lives. Rarely do they mind about their conducts and funny enough, they are good and fast at recruiting the so called ‘Mafans’.

The please call me Students.

Other than frequenting your inbox with ‘please call me’ messages, they are always fast to ask you for whatever they think is best for them. They are the likes of; si unisambazie, nakamia sapa, HELB yako imekam? To them the weather never changes; they fail to differentiate between hard and soft economic times. More too that, they are best at popping in at mealtimes, uninvited of course! On the contrary, they understand themselves better and know when to say yes or no. Rarely are they bodily misused as compared to ‘free call’ students furthermore they are materialistic and always jump from a relationship to another depending on the benefits.

The Toubabs

Toubabs is a Senegalese word meaning Westerners. These are the likes who when they join campus from village, quickly undergo Pauline conversion and adapt to the western way of life in campus. For ladies, they wear tiny dresses, pedal whatever, and too much makeup and very soon they may yet introduce the ‘Behind cure’ and ‘front cure’. They frequent the Academic Highway only to show off. For men, it seems worse, falling trousers, caps facing northwest or even south-south west and big welding goggles. Their lifestyle has branded them high-class even when they are far from the middle/average class.

Village Hoi polloi

Really, you can take someone away from the village, but you cannot take away the village from them. These comrades socialise amongst themselves and feel inferior in company of other groups. Funny enough, they cover their nakedness, they don’t dress! They never eat at the mess, arguing that their food is too little for their stomachs, they cook.

Find your category. You can graduate from a category to another depending on how you start approaching life issues.

The Writer is 1st Year, Eng/Lit. School of Education

More Than A Gold-digger – BY MARIKIO MUCHIRI

Huyu dame si dame wee nimependwa na jini mwenzenu aaah! Sudi boy and Rojo mo were so on point when they sang of having fallen in love with a vampire. City life came; excitement filled him, and beautiful gorgeous pretty glamorous elegant sexy ladies at his disposal. Teejay was lucky to ‘kwachua’ a brown short one to be precise. He had goals and visions to achieve in the city but that became a forgotten past to him. “I have been in campus for the last four years, what else is there for me to achieve?” he could always be heard asking.

Our childhood friendship was wrapped up neatly and carefully placed in the compost pit. All he thought of was sex and who to have it with. He became more than a spoilt brat; spending extravagantly on any chic who grinned at him as long as he could get the benefits afterwards. The cheeky chics took my position as a friend.

Back to the brown short one, a real entrepreneur she was. She noted his weakness and decided to make the best use of it. Emptying every single cent from my spoilt guy’s pocket. She completely tied him down and he could always sing according to her rhythm. She served him in the best way as long as the wallet was properly loaded for her. Kumbe she was the ‘p.o.k.o wa mtaani’. Moving from street to street, providing her goodies to any willing buyer. I once again warned my good guy but he was too deaf to give me his ears.

Days passed and the two crazy lovebirds went on with their blind love. They seemed to enjoy their give and take way of life. Soon, my good guy developed a soar on the lip which he was so quick to proudly ignore as a love bite. More and more came up and he decided to take my advice and went for testing. The result came as a shock to him. He was HIV positive.

Confusion engulfed him. Perplexity overwhelmed him. Shame overcame him. Life suddenly came to a standstill.  Suicide became the better and appropriate option. On Wednesday morning I got this startling text. “My dear pal, my morning is awesome but I am on my way to heaven or hell”. For a minute I stood stationary unable to contemplate on my next move. Out of my room I dashed off.

Thanks to the beloved bodaboda riders I managed to get to my friend’s room as he took his last breath. A green rope tied to his slim neck. His final words have been and will always be my guiding light; life is long enough for you to achieve all your goals, you have so much untapped potential and there is no need of taking it to the grave, life has been unfair to me and I won’t survive its hostility. Please achieve the goals that I never did…” unfortunately he was not strong enough to hold on, he went silent and cold, dead and dead forever.

I will not shed any more tears for you. But I always ask numerous questions, why did you have to leave me so soon?  What about the many dreams we had as small kids? The huge bungalows we promised to build? The doctorate you planned to get? Why…why…why did you have to leave me?…

To Be continued

The writer is a 2nd year, LMC Student

School of Arts & Social Sciences

WHEN ELECTIONS COMES… – BY OTIENO RODGERS

If you do not like something change it. Change the way you think about it. We cannot have change without change. I can see, I can see it, I can see it coming not in the far future. This is my call – change – to the forthcoming SGC and the comrades who will bestow them the power to serve in those offices. It is just about three months since we voted the 26th SGC and a lot of questions and concerns have been raised by comrades. Other comrades have gone to the extent of presupposing the providence of the current SGC which should not be the case.

Foremost, to the comrades who cast votes, it’s my greatest desire that you carry this democratic right with a lot of caution while maintaining high integrity. Secondly, to those comrades who fail to vote remember that the ‘Bad’ leaders are sent to power by the ‘good’ people who fail to vote.  What’s more, the other comrades who are always in complain of poor leadership remember the vote is the most powerful instrument ever devised by man for breaking down injustice and the terrible walls which imprison the common man – comrades. Another thing comrades need to know, let us vote for what one is going to do and not individuality as had been witnessed before. Let us not vote one because of his oratory skills! Always vote for principles and those showing potential of good leadership so that we may cherish the sweetest reflections that our votes are never lost.

To those who are aspiring to be in the next SGC, it is time you start sharpening your skills and put right your principles of good leadership, character and integrity. A have a good difficult task before you to win our votes. It high time that you begin to think catchy campaign slogans unlike those we are used to “vote for me” on a poster and hang it above the drinking fountains and wash rooms for it won’t work out for you next time we vote. Be prepared to respond to the following questions in your manifestos.

  • Why did you choose to run?
  • What would you do differently if you are elected?
  • How will you make a good chairman, Secretary General (or any other post) if elected?

My advice to you, don’t risk coming with unrealistic promises such as;

 

“if you vote me the director of academics, I will reduce homework and ensure all Fridays’ classes are eliminated so that your weekends starts on Thursday evenings.”

 

Thumbs up for the achievements by the current SGC in the sector of accommodation for at least there is hopes of new rooms next semester since the completion of wing B of hostel M. What is more; the MUSO cybercafé is up and operating.

 

The writer is a 2nd year, LMC

School of Arts and Social Sciences

 

CAUGHT IN ‘BULL’S EYE’ – BY MUKAYA KELVIN

With the conditions extremely cold and wet, everyone is doing it or so they say. And I must confess that I am no exception. A man will always look for a place where to put down his head when the weather goes cold. The arrival of first years makes it even simpler and better thanks to the new systems in place I must commend the administrator. With the new academic calendar in place, things are so unpredictable that you can easily commit a crime and walk away with it. By that I mean the 10pm to 10 am rule and its ‘results’.  It sounds funny but also it is a concrete fact.

Last Tuesday I had this chance that I could not afford to let it go! Having a fresh blood just for your self is such a rare and real experience in campus. Cometh the hour cometh the man.  I took the bull this time not by its horns but rather by its tail. The dancing was so great considering the fact that I was the only one aware of the rhythm we were dancing to. The first move was not so difficult.  Rule number one, be ready for the occasion and for my case I wore my faded dark blue suit, a green shirt and a red tie. My friends can tell you that I rarely put on official clad so this was a unusual experience; even if you call my dressing code a walking rainbow I don’t care, she liked it anyway.

Having perfected my linguistic skills and upgraded my vocabulary RAM, creating a rapport was no big issue. “Hae pretty one, what a good pasque flower shaped dress! What a lovely day that the gods saw it well to fling a likening of mesembryanthemum with a beatific so vibrant. I must own up that you are a wrasse of my waters. My ticker has no doubt that you are the pace setter of my existence.”

Slowly and steadily I was making the move that any typical man can make. And soon, both parties were reading from the same page. We were having such a smooth chat though at times I could get tensed although could perfectly cover it up by adjusting my tie back into position even when it had not moved an inch.  As the conversation went on there came the hour when we had to part and may be, do the normal ‘bits and pieces’. All this time I had perfectly concealed my accent. In other word I had tried as much as possible to run away from my mother tongue accent but all over a sudden she came out this time louder. “Wacha niende kuwatch papa sirandura” by now I know you are looking at my name to exactly tell my speech community but that is not the issue. As if she had not gotten it she pardoned me to come up again, “ati sirawhat?” “No I meant chilandura, holy crap! The second one was so pathetic than the first one. My accent did not matter here but what I had said in between the conversation- I am a media student eyeing to work with the CNN very soon. Gosh! With such grammatical slip-up! I wish I had not said it in the first place.

“Are you crazy! How dare you use such big vocabularies that you cannot tell the meaning and miss such a simple word? Am not that contemptible!”

That is how Belinda left. Thanks heaven I had saved her contacts, I’ll check with her.

 

The writer is a 2nd year, LMC

School of Arts And Social sciences